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Fluoxetine Can Cause Epileptogenesis and Aberrant Neurogenesis in Male Wild-Type Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Developmental Neuroscience, June 2023
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 540)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

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Title
Fluoxetine Can Cause Epileptogenesis and Aberrant Neurogenesis in Male Wild-Type Mice
Published in
Developmental Neuroscience, June 2023
DOI 10.1159/000531478
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ksenia Musaelyan, Mark A. Horowitz, Stephen McHugh, Francis G. Szele

Abstract

Antidepressants in general, and fluoxetine in particular, increase adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in mice. Here we asked how the antidepressant fluoxetine affects behavior and AHN in a corticosterone model of depression. In three groups of adult male C57BL/6j mice we administered either vehicle (VEH), corticosterone (CORT) treatment to induce a depression-like state or corticosterone plus a standard dose of fluoxetine (CORT+FLX). Following treatment, mice performed the open field test, the novelty suppressed feeding (NSF) test and the splash test. Neurogenesis was assessed by means of immunohistochemistry using BrdU and neuronal maturation markers. Unexpectedly, 42% of the CORT+FLX-treated mice exhibited severe weight loss, seizures and sudden death. As expected, the CORT treated group had altered behaviors compared to the VEH group, but the CORT+FLX mice that survived did not show any behavioral improvement compared to the CORT group. Antidepressants generally increase neurogenesis and here we also found that compared to CORT mice, CORT+FLX mice that survived had a significantly greater density of BrdU+, BrdU+DCX+ and BrdU+NeuN+ cells, suggesting increased neurogenesis. Moreover, the density of BrdU+NeuN+ cells was increased in an aberrant location, the hilus, of CORT+FLX mice, similar to previous studies describing aberrant neurogenesis following seizures. In conclusion, fluoxetine could induce considerable adverse effects in wild type mice, including seizure-like activity. Fluoxetine-induced neurogenesis increases could be related to this activity, therefore proneurogenic effects of fluoxetine and other antidepressants, especially in the absence of any behavioral therapeutic effects, should be interpreted with caution.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 33%
Student > Master 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 33%
Psychology 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2024.
All research outputs
#1,356,565
of 26,149,954 outputs
Outputs from Developmental Neuroscience
#12
of 540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,725
of 392,840 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Developmental Neuroscience
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,149,954 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 392,840 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them