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Inequalities in healthy life expectancy by Brazilian geographic regions: findings from the National Health Survey, 2013

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Inequalities in healthy life expectancy by Brazilian geographic regions: findings from the National Health Survey, 2013
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12939-016-0432-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Célia Landmann Szwarcwald, Paulo Roberto Borges de Souza Júnior, Aline Pinto Marques, Wanessa da Silva de Almeida, Dalia Elena Romero Montilla

Abstract

The demographic shift and epidemiologic transition in Brazil have drawn attention to ways of measuring population health that complement studies of mortality. In this paper, we investigate regional differences in healthy life expectancy based on information from the National Health Survey (PNS), 2013. In the survey, a three-stage cluster sampling (census tracts, households and individuals) with stratification of the primary sampling units and random selection in all stages was used to select 60,202 Brazilian adults (18 years and over). Healthy life expectancies (HLE) were estimated by Sullivan's method according to sex, age and geographic region, using poor self-rated health for defining unhealthy status. Logistic regression models were used to investigate socioeconomic and regional inequalities in poor self-rated health, after controlling by sex and age. Wide disparities by geographic region were found with the worst indicators in the North and Northeast regions, whether considering educational attainment, material deprivation, or health care utilization. Life expectancy at birth for women and men living in the richest regions was 5 years longer than for those living in the less wealthy regions. Modeling the variation across regions for poor self-rated health, statistically significant effects (p < 0.001) were found for the North and Northeast when compared to the Southeast, even after controlling for age, sex, diagnosis of at least one non-communicable chronic disease, and schooling or socioeconomic class. Marked regional inequalities in HLE were found, with the loss of healthy life much higher among residents of the poorest regions, especially among the elderly. By combining data on self-rated health status and mortality in a single indicator, Healthy Life Expectancy, this study demonstrated the excess burden of poor health experienced by populations in the less wealthy regions of Brazil. To mitigate the effects of social exclusion, the development of strategies at the regional level is essential to provide health care to all persons in need, reduce risk exposures, support prevention policies for adoption of healthy behaviors. Such strategies should prioritize population groups that will experience the greatest impact from such interventions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 76 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Postgraduate 8 10%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 17 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 4%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 20 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2016.
All research outputs
#1,323,411
of 8,779,653 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#202
of 777 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,448
of 299,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#12
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,779,653 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 777 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,502 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.