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Functional analysis for gut microbes of the brown tree frog (Polypedates megacephalus) in artificial hibernation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Functional analysis for gut microbes of the brown tree frog (Polypedates megacephalus) in artificial hibernation
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-3318-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francis Cheng-Hsuan Weng, Yi-Ju Yang, Daryi Wang

Abstract

Annual hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals conserve energy during food shortage in winter. This natural cycle is also accompanied by a remodeling of the intestinal immune system, which is an aspect of host biology that is both influenced by, and can itself influence, the microbiota. In amphibians, the bacteria in the intestinal tract show a drop in bacterial counts. The proportion of pathogenic bacteria is greater in hibernating frogs than that found in nonhibernating frogs. This suggests that some intestinal gut microbes in amphibians can be maintained and may contribute to the functions in this closed ecosystem during hibernation. However, these results were derived from culture-based approaches that only covered a small portion of bacteria in the intestinal tract. In this study, we use a more comprehensive analysis, including bacterial appearance and functional prediction, to reveal the global changes in gut microbiota during artificial hibernation via high-throughput sequencing technology. Our results suggest that artificial hibernation in the brown tree frog (Polypedates megacephalus) could reduce microbial diversity, and artificially hibernating frogs tend to harbor core operational taxonomic units that are rarely distributed among nonhibernating frogs. In addition, artificial hibernation increased significantly the relative abundance of the red-leg syndrome-related pathogenic genus Citrobacter. Furthermore, functional predictions via PICRUSt and Tax4Fun suggested that artificial hibernation has effects on metabolism, disease, signal transduction, bacterial infection, and primary immunodeficiency. We infer that artificial hibernation may impose potential effects on primary immunodeficiency and increase the risk of bacterial infections in the brown tree frog.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 27%
Student > Bachelor 9 27%
Researcher 3 9%
Unspecified 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 55%
Unspecified 6 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,536,668
of 11,691,744 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#866
of 6,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,058
of 324,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#35
of 205 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,691,744 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,968 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,475 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 205 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.