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The thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway is critical in sleep architecture

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, December 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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9 Mendeley
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Title
The thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway is critical in sleep architecture
Published in
Molecular Brain, December 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13041-016-0276-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joohyeon Hong, Jungryun Lee, Kiyeong Song, Go Eun Ha, Yong Ryoul Yang, Ji Su Ma, Masahiro Yamamoto, Hee-Sup Shin, Pann-Ghill Suh, Eunji Cheong

Abstract

The transition from wakefulness to a nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep state at the onset of sleep involves a transition from low-voltage, high-frequency irregular electroencephalography (EEG) waveforms to large-amplitude, low-frequency EEG waveforms accompanying synchronized oscillatory activity in the thalamocortical circuit. The thalamocortical circuit consists of reciprocal connections between the thalamus and cortex. The cortex sends strong excitatory feedback to the thalamus, however the function of which is unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of the thalamic metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1)-phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4) pathway in sleep control in PLCβ4-deficient (PLCβ4(-/-)) mice. The thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway contains synapses that receive corticothalamic inputs. In PLCβ4(-/-) mice, the transition from wakefulness to the NREM sleep state was stimulated, and the NREM sleep state was stabilized, which resulted in increased NREM sleep. The power density of delta (δ) waves increased in parallel with the increased NREM sleep. These sleep phenotypes in PLCβ4(-/-) mice were consistent in TC-restricted PLCβ4 knockdown mice. Moreover, in vitro intrathalamic oscillations were greatly enhanced in the PLCβ4(-/-) slices. The results of our study showed that thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway was critical in controlling sleep architecture.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 56%
Researcher 3 33%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 5 56%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,942,384
of 16,251,718 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#94
of 822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,110
of 389,789 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#8
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,251,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 822 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,789 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.