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Impaired non-speech auditory processing at a pre-reading age is a risk-factor for dyslexia but not a predictor: An ERP study.

Overview of attention for article published in Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior, May 2012
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

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16 tweeters

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94 Mendeley
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4 CiteULike
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Title
Impaired non-speech auditory processing at a pre-reading age is a risk-factor for dyslexia but not a predictor: An ERP study.
Published in
Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior, May 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.cortex.2012.02.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Plakas A, van Zuijen T, van Leeuwen T, Thomson JM, van der Leij A, Anna Plakas, Titia van Zuijen, Theo van Leeuwen, Jennifer M. Thomson, Aryan van der Leij

Abstract

Impaired auditory sensitivity to amplitude rise time (ART) has been suggested to be a primary deficit in developmental dyslexia. The present study investigates whether impaired ART-sensitivity at a pre-reading age precedes and predicts later emerging reading problems in a sample of Dutch children. An oddball paradigm, with a deviant that differed from the standard stimulus in ART, was administered to 41-month-old children (30 genetically at-risk for developmental dyslexia and 14 controls) with concurrent EEG measurement. A second deviant that differed from the standard stimulus in frequency served as a control deviant. Grade two reading scores were used to divide the at-risks in a typical-reading and a dyslexic subgroup. We found that both ART- and frequency processing were related to later reading skill. We however also found that irrespective of reading level, the at-risks in general showed impaired basic auditory processing when compared to controls and that it was impossible to discriminate between the at-risk groups on basis of both auditory measures. A relatively higher quality of early expressive syntactic skills in the typical-reading at-risk group might indicate a protective factor against negative effects of impaired auditory processing on reading development. Based on these results we argue that ART- and frequency-processing measures, although they are related to reading skill, lack the power to be considered single-cause predictors of developmental dyslexia. More likely, they are genetically driven risk factors that may add to cumulative effects on processes that are critical for learning to read.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 3%
Netherlands 3 3%
Spain 2 2%
Germany 1 1%
Israel 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Greece 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 80 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 31%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Master 9 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 9%
Other 24 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 42 45%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Neuroscience 9 10%
Unspecified 8 9%
Linguistics 6 6%
Other 19 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2014.
All research outputs
#594,408
of 7,341,719 outputs
Outputs from Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior
#188
of 1,245 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,319
of 119,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior
#3
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,341,719 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,245 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.