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Vagus nerve inflammation contributes to dysautonomia in COVID-19

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica, July 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 2,554)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 news outlets
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1611 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Vagus nerve inflammation contributes to dysautonomia in COVID-19
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica, July 2023
DOI 10.1007/s00401-023-02612-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcel S. Woo, Mohsin Shafiq, Antonia Fitzek, Matthias Dottermusch, Hermann Altmeppen, Behnam Mohammadi, Christina Mayer, Lukas C. Bal, Lukas Raich, Jakob Matschke, Susanne Krasemann, Susanne Pfefferle, Thomas Theo Brehm, Marc Lütgehetmann, Julia Schädler, Marylyn M. Addo, Julian Schulze zur Wiesch, Benjamin Ondruschka, Manuel A. Friese, Markus Glatzel

Abstract

Dysautonomia has substantially impacted acute COVID-19 severity as well as symptom burden after recovery from COVID-19 (long COVID), yet the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that vagus nerves are affected in COVID-19 which might contribute to autonomic dysfunction. We performed a histopathological characterization of postmortem vagus nerves from COVID-19 patients and controls, and detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA together with inflammatory cell infiltration composed primarily of monocytes. Furthermore, we performed RNA sequencing which revealed a strong inflammatory response of neurons, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells which correlated with SARS-CoV-2 RNA load. Lastly, we screened a clinical cohort of 323 patients to detect a clinical phenotype of vagus nerve affection and found a decreased respiratory rate in non-survivors of critical COVID-19. Our data suggest that SARS-CoV-2 induces vagus nerve inflammation followed by autonomic dysfunction which contributes to critical disease courses and might contribute to dysautonomia observed in long COVID.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,611 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 19%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Student > Master 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Neuroscience 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 10 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 765. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2024.
All research outputs
#26,000
of 25,758,211 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica
#7
of 2,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#691
of 368,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica
#1
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,758,211 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,554 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 368,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.