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Human Trafficking, Mental Illness, and Addiction: Avoiding Diagnostic Overshadowing

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, January 2017
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Mentioned by

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114 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Human Trafficking, Mental Illness, and Addiction: Avoiding Diagnostic Overshadowing
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, January 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.1.ecas3-1701
Pubmed ID
Abstract

This article reviews an emergency department-based clinical vignette of a trafficked patient with co-occurring pregnancy-related, mental health, and substance use disorder issues. The authors, including a survivor of human trafficking, draw on their backgrounds in addiction care, human trafficking, emergency medicine, and psychiatry to review the literature on relevant general health and mental health consequences of trafficking and propose an approach to the clinical complexities this case presents. In their discussion, the authors explicate the deleterious role of implicit bias and diagnostic overshadowing in trafficked patients with co-occurring addiction and mental illness. Finally, the authors propose a trauma-informed, multidisciplinary response to potentially trafficked patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 114 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 25%
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Researcher 5 10%
Librarian 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 33%
Social Sciences 9 18%
Psychology 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 7 14%