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Caring for the Trafficked Patient: Ethical Challenges and Recommendations for Health Care Professionals

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, January 2017
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14 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
Title
Caring for the Trafficked Patient: Ethical Challenges and Recommendations for Health Care Professionals
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, January 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.1.msoc2-1701
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Human trafficking is an egregious human rights violation with profound negative physical and psychological consequences, including communicable diseases, substance use disorders, and mental illnesses. The health needs of this population are multiple, complex, and influenced by past and present experiences of abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Effective health care services for trafficked patients require clinicians to consider individual patients' needs, wishes, goals, priorities, risks, and vulnerabilities as well as public health implications and even resource allocation. Applying the bioethical principles of respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice, this article considers the ethics of care model as a trauma-informed framework for providing health care to human trafficking victims and survivors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 27%
Psychology 4 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 18%
Social Sciences 3 14%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 2 9%