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Altered bile acid metabolism in skin tissues in response to ionizing radiation: deoxycholic acid (DCA) as a novel treatment for radiogenic skin injury

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Radiation Biology, August 2023
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

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Title
Altered bile acid metabolism in skin tissues in response to ionizing radiation: deoxycholic acid (DCA) as a novel treatment for radiogenic skin injury
Published in
International Journal of Radiation Biology, August 2023
DOI 10.1080/09553002.2023.2245461
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yining Zhang, Tao Yan, Wei Mo, Bin Song, Yuehua Zhang, Fenghao Geng, Zhimin Hu, Daojiang Yu, Shuyu Zhang

Abstract

Radiogenic skin injury is a common complication during cancer radiotherapy or accidental exposure to radiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the metabolism of bile acids (BA) and their derivatives during radiogenic skin injury. Rat skin tissues were irradiated by an X-ray linear accelerator. The quantification of bile acids and their derivatives were performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative analysis. Key enzymes in BA biosynthesis were analyzed from single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-Seq) data of radiogenic skin injury in the human patient and animal models. The in vivo radioprotective effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA) was detected in irradiated SD rats. 12 BA metabolites showed significant differences during the progression of radiogenic skin injury. Among them, the levels of cholic acid (CA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), muricholic acid (MCA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), glycohyodeoxycholic acid (GHCA), 12-ketolithocholic acid (12-ketoLCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) were significantly elevated in irradiated skin, whereas lithocholic acid (LCA), tauro-β-muricholic acid (TβMCA) and taurocholic acid (TCA) were significantly decreased. Additionally, the results of scRNA-Seq indicated that genes involved in 7a-hydroxylation process, the first step in BA synthesis, showed pronounced alterations in skin fibroblasts or keratinocytes. The alternative pathway of BA synthesis is more actively altered than the classical pathway after ionizing radiation. In the model of rat radiogenic skin damage, DCA promoted wound healing and attenuated epidermal hyperplasia. Ionizing radiation modulates the metabolism of bile acids. DCA is a prospective therapeutic agent for the treatment of radiogenic skin injury.

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Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2023.
All research outputs
#2,963,060
of 24,326,994 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Radiation Biology
#80
of 1,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,734
of 163,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Radiation Biology
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,326,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,855 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,942 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.