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A decade of boreal rich fen greenhouse gas fluxes in response to natural and experimental water table variability

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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25 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
A decade of boreal rich fen greenhouse gas fluxes in response to natural and experimental water table variability
Published in
Global Change Biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13612
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Olefeldt, Eugénie S. Euskirchen, Jennifer Harden, Evan Kane, A. David McGuire, Mark P. Waldrop, Merritt R. Turetsky

Abstract

Rich fens are common boreal ecosystems with distinct hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology that influence their carbon (C) balance. We present growing season soil chamber methane emission (FCH4 ), ecosystem respiration (ER), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and gross primary production (GPP) fluxes from a nine year water table manipulation experiment in an Alaskan rich fen. The study included major flood and drought years, where wetting and drying treatments further modified the severity of droughts. Results support previous findings from peatlands that drought causes reduced magnitude of growing season FCH4 , GPP, and NEE, thus reducing or reversing their C sink function. Experimentally exacerbated droughts further reduced the capacity for the fen to act as a C sink by causing shifts in vegetation and thus reducing magnitude of maximum growing season GPP in subsequent flood years by ~15% compared to control plots. Conversely, water table position had only a weak influence on ER, but dominant contribution to ER switched from autotrophic respiration in wet years to heterotrophic in dry years. Droughts did not cause inter-annual lag effects on ER in this rich fen, as has been observed in several nutrient poor peatlands. While ER was dependent on soil temperatures at 2 cm depth, FCH4 was linked to soil temperatures at 25 cm. Inter-annual variability of deep soil temperatures was in turn dependent on wetness rather than air temperature, and higher FCH4 in flooded years was thus equally due to increased methane production at depth and decreased methane oxidation near the surface. Short-term fluctuations in wetness caused significant lag effects on FCH4 , but droughts caused no inter-annual lag effects on FCH4 . Our results show that frequency and severity of droughts and floods can have characteristic effects on the exchange of greenhouse gases, and emphasizes the need to project future hydrological regimes in rich fens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Unknown 63 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 26%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 3 5%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 33 51%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Unspecified 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 15 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,110,800
of 13,496,161 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#1,348
of 3,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,622
of 373,351 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#40
of 111 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,496,161 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,671 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,351 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 111 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.