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Differential Radiographic Appearance of BRAF V600E-Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Patients Matched by Primary Tumor Location.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (JNCCN), December 2016
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2 tweeters

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Title
Differential Radiographic Appearance of BRAF V600E-Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Patients Matched by Primary Tumor Location.
Published in
Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (JNCCN), December 2016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chloe E. Atreya, Claire Greene, Ryan M. McWhirter, Nabia S. Ikram, I. Elaine Allen, Katherine Van Loon, Alan P. Venook, Benjamin M. Yeh, Spencer C. Behr

Abstract

BRAF-mutant metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRCs) share many clinicopathologic features with right-sided colon tumors, including frequent peritoneal involvement. Because of the poorer outcomes associated with BRAF mutations, early enrollment in clinical trials has been encouraged. However, the use of standard eligibility and assessment criteria, such as measurable disease, has anecdotally impeded patient accrual and restricted appraisal of treatment response. We investigated whether the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation is differentially associated with sites and appearance of metastatic disease in patients matched by primary tumor location. A total of 40 patients with BRAF-mutant mCRC were matched to 80 patients with BRAF wild-type mCRC by location of primary tumor (right or left colon; rectum), sex, and age. Associations between BRAF mutation status and clinicopathologic characteristics and metastatic sites were analyzed using proportion tests. Survival was summarized with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. The distribution of primary tumor locations was: 60% right colon, 30% left colon, and 10% rectum. Compared with BRAF wild-type tumors, BRAF-mutant tumors more commonly associated with peritoneal metastases (50% vs 31%; P=.045) and ascites (50% vs 24%; P=.0038). In patients with left colon primaries, BRAF mutations were associated with more frequent ascites (58% vs 12%; P=.0038) and less frequent liver metastases (42% vs 79%; P=.024). Among patients with right colon primaries, no significant difference in sites of disease by BRAF mutation status was observed. Disease was not measurable by RECIST 1.1 in 24% of patients with right-sided primary tumors, irrespective of BRAF mutation status. In the BRAF-mutated cohort, ascites correlated unfavorably with survival (hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.14, 4.83; P=.02). Greater frequency of ascites and peritoneal metastases, which pose challenges for RECIST 1.1 interpretation of therapeutic outcomes, are seen with BRAF-mutant mCRC, even when patients are matched for primary tumor location.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 4 44%
Unspecified 3 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 56%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2017.
All research outputs
#8,727,878
of 11,337,824 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (JNCCN)
#417
of 640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,855
of 317,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (JNCCN)
#17
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,337,824 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,644 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.