↓ Skip to main content

The Enterococcus faecium Enterococcal Biofilm Regulator, EbrB, Regulates the esp Operon and Is Implicated in Biofilm Formation and Intestinal Colonization

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The Enterococcus faecium Enterococcal Biofilm Regulator, EbrB, Regulates the esp Operon and Is Implicated in Biofilm Formation and Intestinal Colonization
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0065224
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janetta Top, Fernanda L. Paganelli, Xinglin Zhang, Willem van Schaik, Helen L. Leavis, Miranda van Luit-Asbroek, Tom van der Poll, Masja Leendertse, Marc J. M. Bonten, Rob J. L. Willems

Abstract

Nowadays, Enterococcus faecium is one of the leading nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Strains causing clinical infections or hospital outbreaks are enriched in the enterococcal surface protein (Esp) encoding ICEEfm1 mobile genetic element. Previous studies showed that Esp is involved in biofilm formation, endocarditis and urinary tract infections. In this study, we characterized the role of the putative AraC type of regulator (locus tag EfmE1162_2351), which we renamed ebrB and which is, based on the currently available whole genome sequences, always located upstream of the esp gene, and studied its role in Esp surface exposure during growth. A markerless deletion mutant of ebrB resulted in reduced esp expression and complete abolishment of Esp surface exposure, while Esp cell-surface exposure was restored when this mutant was complemented with an intact copy of ebrB. This demonstrates a role for EbrB in esp expression. However, during growth, ebrB expression levels did not change over time, while an increase in esp expression at both RNA and protein level was observed during mid-log and late-log phase. These results indicate the existence of a secondary regulation system for esp, which might be an unknown quorum sensing system as the enhanced esp expression seems to be cell density dependent. Furthermore, we determined that esp is part of an operon of at least 3 genes putatively involved in biofilm formation. A semi-static biofilm model revealed reduced biofilm formation for the EbrB deficient mutant, while dynamics of biofilm formation using a flow cell system revealed delayed biofilm formation in the ebrB mutant. In a mouse intestinal colonization model the ebrB mutant was less able to colonize the gut compared to wild-type strain, especially in the small intestine. These data indicate that EbrB positively regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 30%
Researcher 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Other 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 37%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2013.
All research outputs
#5,977,133
of 11,331,824 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#54,473
of 125,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,459
of 133,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,725
of 3,804 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,331,824 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 125,994 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,222 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,804 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.