↓ Skip to main content

Craniodental ecomorphology of the large Jurassic ichthyosaurian Temnodontosaurus

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Anatomy, August 2023
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
99 X users
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Craniodental ecomorphology of the large Jurassic ichthyosaurian Temnodontosaurus
Published in
Journal of Anatomy, August 2023
DOI 10.1111/joa.13939
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. F. Bennion, E. E. Maxwell, O. Lambert, V. Fischer

Abstract

Marine amniotes have played many crucial roles in ocean ecosystems since the Triassic, including predation at the highest trophic levels. One genus often placed into this guild is the large Early Jurassic neoichthyosaurian Temnodontosaurus, the only post-Triassic ichthyosaurian known with teeth which bear a distinct cutting edge or carina. This taxonomically problematic genus is currently composed of seven species which show a wide variety of skull and tooth morphologies. Here we assess the craniodental disparity in Temnodontosaurus using a series of functionally informative traits. We describe the range of tooth morphologies in the genus in detail, including the first examples of serrated carinae in ichthyosaurians. These consist of false denticles created by the interaction of enamel ridgelets with the carinal keel, as well as possible cryptic true denticles only visible using scanning electron microscopy. We also find evidence for heterodonty in the species T. platyodon, with unicarinate mesial teeth likely playing a role in prey capture and labiolingually compressed, bicarinate distal teeth likely involved in prey processing. This type of heterodonty appears to be convergent with a series of other marine amniotes including early cetaceans. Overall, the species currently referred to as the genus Temnodontosaurus show a range of craniodental configurations allowing prey to be captured and processed in different ways - for example, T. eurycephalus has a deep snout and relatively small bicarinate teeth likely specialised for increased wound infliction and grip-and-tear feeding, whereas T. platyodon has a more elongate yet robust snout and larger teeth and may be more adapted for grip-and-shear feeding. These results suggest the existence of niche partitioning at higher trophic levels in Early Jurassic ichthyosaurians and have implications for future work on the taxonomy of this wastebasket genus, as well as for research into the ecology of other extinct megapredatory marine tetrapods.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 99 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 14%
Student > Master 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Unknown 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 29%
Environmental Science 1 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 14%
Unknown 1 14%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 63. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2023.
All research outputs
#666,627
of 25,295,968 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Anatomy
#78
of 2,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,122
of 346,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Anatomy
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,295,968 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,909 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.