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Health-related quality of life and unmet healthcare needs in Huntington’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Health-related quality of life and unmet healthcare needs in Huntington’s disease
Published in
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12955-016-0575-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marleen R. van Walsem, Emilie I. Howe, Gunvor A. Ruud, Jan C. Frich, Nada Andelic

Abstract

Huntington's disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence of 6 per 100.000. Despite increasing research activity on HD, evidence on healthcare utilization, patients' needs for healthcare services and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is still sparse. The present study describes HRQoL in a Norwegian cohort of HD patients, and assesses associations between unmet healthcare and social support service needs and HRQoL. In this cross-sectional population-based study, 84 patients with a clinical diagnosis of HD living in the South-East of Norway completed the HRQoL questionnaire EuroQol, EQ-5D-3L. Unmet needs for healthcare and social support services were assessed by the Needs and Provision Complexity Scale (NPCS). Furthermore, functional ability was determined using the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) Functional assessment scales. Socio-demographics (age, gender, marital status, occupation, residence, housing situation) and clinical characteristics (disease duration, total functional capacity, comorbidity) were also recorded. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients' HRQoL. Regression analyses were conducted in order to investigate the relationship between unmet healthcare needs and self-reported HRQoL. The patients were divided across five disease stages as follows: Stage I: n = 12 (14%), Stage II: n = 22 (27%), Stage III: n = 19 (23%), Stage IV: n = 14 (16%), and Stage V: n = 17 (20%). Overall HRQoL was lowest in patients with advanced disease (Stages IV and V), while patients in the middle phase (Stage III) showed the most varied health profile for the five EQ-5D-3L dimensions. The regression model including level of unmet needs, clinical characteristics and demographics (age and education) accounted for 42% of variance in HRQoL. A higher level of unmet needs was associated with lower HRQoL (β value - 0.228; p = 0.018) whereas a better total functional capacity corresponded to higher HRQoL (β value 0.564; p < 0.001). The study findings suggest that patients with HD do not receive healthcare services that could have a positive impact on their HRQoL.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 18%
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 13%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 12 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Psychology 7 10%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2017.
All research outputs
#2,475,246
of 15,442,255 outputs
Outputs from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#243
of 1,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,989
of 385,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#17
of 259 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,442,255 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,660 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 259 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.