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Virulence and transmission characteristics of clade 2.3.4.4b H5N6 subtype avian influenza viruses possessing different internal gene constellations

Overview of attention for article published in Virulence, August 2023
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

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9 X users

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Title
Virulence and transmission characteristics of clade 2.3.4.4b H5N6 subtype avian influenza viruses possessing different internal gene constellations
Published in
Virulence, August 2023
DOI 10.1080/21505594.2023.2250065
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wanchen Zhao, Xin Liu, Xinyu Zhang, Zhiwei Qiu, Jun Jiao, Yang Li, Ruyi Gao, Xiaoquan Wang, Jiao Hu, Xiaowen Liu, Shunlin Hu, Xinan Jiao, Daxin Peng, Min Gu, Xiufan Liu

Abstract

Clade 2.3.4.4 H5N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) has been predominant in poultry in China, and the circulating haemagglutinin (HA) gene has changed from clade 2.3.4.4h to clade 2.3.4.4b in recent years. In 2021, we isolated four H5N6 viruses from ducks during the routine surveillance of AIV in China. The whole-genome sequencing results demonstrated that the four isolates all belonged to the currently prevalent clade 2.3.4.4b but had different internal gene constellations, which could be divided into G1 and G2 genotypes. Specifically, G1 possessed H9-like PB2 and PB1 genes on the H5-like genetic backbone while G2 owned an H3-like PB1 gene and the H5-like remaining internal genes. By determining the characteristics of H5N6 viruses, including growth performance on different cells, plaque-formation ability, virus attachment ability, and pathogenicity and transmission in different animal models, we found that G1 strains were more conducive to replication in mammalian cells (MDCK and A549) and BALB/c mice than G2 strains. However, G2 strains were more advantageously replicated in avian cells (CEF and DF-1) and slightly more transmissible in waterfowls (mallards) than G1 strains. This study enriched the epidemiological data of H5 subtype AIV to further understand its dynamic evolution, and laid the foundation for further research on the mechanism of low pathogenic AIV internal genes in generating novel H5 subtype reassortants.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 1 25%
Unspecified 1 25%
Unknown 2 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 25%
Unknown 2 50%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2023.
All research outputs
#6,950,186
of 25,292,646 outputs
Outputs from Virulence
#271
of 1,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,390
of 344,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virulence
#3
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,292,646 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,186 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.