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Resistance training in depression

Overview of attention for article published in Deutsches Aerzteblatt International, November 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 1,275)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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2 news outlets
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1 blog
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Title
Resistance training in depression
Published in
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International, November 2023
DOI 10.3238/arztebl.m2023.0196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noah Augustin, Antonia Bendau, Selina Heuer, Jan Kaminski, Andreas Ströhle

Abstract

More than 320 million people around the world suffer from depression. Physical activity and sports are effective treatment strategies. Endurance training has already been intensively studied, but any potential antidepressant effect of resistance training is unknown at present, nor is it clear whether this could yield any relevant benefit in clinical use. The PubMed database was selectively searched for recent studies and review articles concerning the use, efficacy, and safety of resistance training in persons with depressive symptoms and diagnosed depression. Two meta-analyses revealed that resistance training alleviated depressive symptoms with a low to moderate effect size (0.39-0.66). Resistance training in patients with diagnosed depression was studied in seven randomized controlled trials, in which the duration of the intervention ranged from eight weeks to eight months. In six of these trials, the depressive symptoms were reduced. In one trial, a persistent benefit was seen in the resistance-training group at 26 months of follow-up (adherence, 33%). Moreover, resistance training improved strength, quality of life, and quality of sleep. No serious adverse events occurred; this indicates that resistance training in depression is safe. Resistance training seems to have an antidepressant effect. Open questions remain concerning its effects in different age groups, as well as the optimal training parameters. Further high-quality trials will be needed to document the effect of resistance training more conclusively and to enable the formulation of treatment recommendations.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 100%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 101. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2024.
All research outputs
#416,926
of 25,375,376 outputs
Outputs from Deutsches Aerzteblatt International
#37
of 1,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,974
of 348,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Deutsches Aerzteblatt International
#1
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,375,376 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,275 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,853 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.