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Leaving safety to visit a feeding site: is it optimal to hesitate while exposed?

Overview of attention for article published in Royal Society Open Science, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Leaving safety to visit a feeding site: is it optimal to hesitate while exposed?
Published in
Royal Society Open Science, January 2017
DOI 10.1098/rsos.160910
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sean A. Rands

Abstract

Animals living in complex environments experience differing risks of predation depending upon their location within the landscape. An animal could reduce the risk it experiences by remaining in a refuge site, but it may need to emerge from its refuge and enter more dangerous sites for feeding and other activities. Here, I consider the actions of an animal choosing to travel a short distance between a safe refuge and a dangerous foraging site, such as a bird leaving cover to visit a feeder. Although much work has been conducted examining the choice between a refuge and a foraging site when faced with a trade-off between starvation and predation risk, the work presented here is the first to consider the travel behaviour between these locations. Using state-dependent stochastic dynamic programming, I illustrate that there are several forms of optimal behaviour that can emerge. In some situations, the animal should choose to travel without stopping between sites, but in other cases, it is optimal for the animal to travel hesitantly towards the food, and to stop its travel at a point before it reaches the refuge. I discuss how this hesitant 'dawdling' behaviour may be optimal, and suggest further work to test these predictions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 29%
Researcher 2 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 14%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 43%
Environmental Science 3 21%
Psychology 2 14%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Unknown 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,485,922
of 17,015,490 outputs
Outputs from Royal Society Open Science
#1,673
of 3,094 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,082
of 393,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Royal Society Open Science
#75
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,015,490 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,094 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.3. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.