↓ Skip to main content

Subpollen particles are rich carriers of major short ragweed allergens and NADH dehydrogenases: quantitative proteomic and allergomic study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical & Experimental Allergy, January 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Subpollen particles are rich carriers of major short ragweed allergens and NADH dehydrogenases: quantitative proteomic and allergomic study
Published in
Clinical & Experimental Allergy, January 2017
DOI 10.1111/cea.12874
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. Smiljanic, D. Apostolovic, S. Trifunovic, J. Ognjenovic, M. Perusko, L. Mihajlovic, L. Burazer, M. van Hage, T. Cirkovic Velickovic

Abstract

Short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) allergies affect more than 36 million people annually. Ragweed pollen grains release sub-pollen particles (SPP) of respirable size upon hydration or a change in air electrical conditions. The aim of this study was to characterise the proteomes and allergomes of short ragweed SPP and total pollen protein extract (TOT), and compare their effects with those of standard aqueous pollen protein extract (APE) using sera from short ragweed pollen-sensitized patients. Quantitative 2D gel-based and shotgun proteomics, 1D and 2D immunoblotting, and quantitative ELISA were applied. Novel SPP extraction and preparation protocols enabled appropriate sample preparation and further downstream analysis by quantitative proteomics. The SPP fraction contained the highest proportion (94%) of the allergome, with the largest quantities of the minor Amb a 4 and major Amb a 1 allergens, and as unique, NADH dehydrogenases. APE was the richest in Amb a 6, Amb 5, and Amb a 3, and TOT fraction was the richest in the Amb a 8 allergens (83% and 89% of allergome, respectively). Allergenic potency correlated well among the three fractions tested, with 1D immunoblots demonstrating a slight predominance of IgE-reactivity to SPP compared to TOT and APE. However, the strongest IgE binding in ELISA was noted against APE. New allergenic candidates, phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglucomutase, were identified in all the three pollen fractions. Enolase, UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, and polygalacturonase were observed in SPP and TOT fractions as novel allergens of the short ragweed pollen, as previously described. We demonstrated that the complete major (Amb a 1 and 11) and almost all minor (Amb a 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9) short ragweed pollen allergen repertoire as well as NADH oxidases are present in SPP, highlighting an important role for SPP in allergic sensitization to short ragweed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 21%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Unknown 5 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 2 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 57%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,430,236
of 12,376,381 outputs
Outputs from Clinical & Experimental Allergy
#2,209
of 2,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,915
of 339,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical & Experimental Allergy
#26
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,376,381 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,710 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,858 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.