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Exploring maturity of electronic medical record use among allied health professionals

Overview of attention for article published in Health Information Management Journal, September 2023
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Title
Exploring maturity of electronic medical record use among allied health professionals
Published in
Health Information Management Journal, September 2023
DOI 10.1177/18333583231198100
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Schwarz, Elizabeth C Ward, Anne Coccetti, Joshua Simmons, Sara Burrett, Philip Juffs, Kristy Perkins

Abstract

Electronic medical records (EMRs) have the potential to improve and streamline the quality and safety of patient care. Harnessing the full benefits of EMR implementation depends on the utilisation of advanced features, defined as "mature usage." At present, little is known about the maturity of EMR usage by allied health professionals (AHPs). To examine current maturity of EMR use by AHPs and explore perceived barriers to mature EMR utilisation and optimisation. AHPs were recruited from three health services. Participants completed a 27-question electronic questionnaire based on the EMR Adoption Framework, which measures clinician EMR utilisation (0 = paper chart, 5 = theoretical maximum) across 10 EMR feature categories. Interviews were conducted with both clinicians and managers to explore the nature of current EMR utilisation and perceived facilitators and barriers to mature usage. Questionnaire responses were obtained from 192 AHPs. The majority of questions (74%) showed a mean score of <3, indicating a lack of mature EMR use. Pockets of mature usage were identified in the categories of health information, referrals and administration processes. Interviews with 18 clinicians and managers revealed barriers to optimisation across three themes: (1) limited understanding of EMR opportunities; (2) complexity of the EMR change process and (3) end-user and environmental factors. Mature usage across EMR feature categories of the EMR Adoption Framework was low. However, questionnaire and qualitative interview data suggested pockets of mature utilisation. Achieving mature allied health EMR use will require strategies implemented at the clinician, EMR support, and service levels.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 25%
Unknown 3 75%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 25%
Unknown 3 75%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2023.
All research outputs
#16,597,003
of 24,417,958 outputs
Outputs from Health Information Management Journal
#123
of 164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,415
of 158,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Information Management Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,417,958 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,700 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them