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Saccade dysfunction associated with chronic petrol sniffing and lead encephalopathy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry, March 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
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1 Connotea
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Title
Saccade dysfunction associated with chronic petrol sniffing and lead encephalopathy
Published in
Journal of neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry, March 2004
DOI 10.1136/jnnp.2003.019406
Pubmed ID
Authors

S Cairney

Abstract

In chronic petrol sniffers, recent exposure to high levels of leaded petrol may give rise to a lead encephalopathy characterised by tremor, chorea, ataxia, hyperreflexia, convulsive seizures, and death. Neurological abnormalities associated with lead encephalopathy involve the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and brain stem. To use saccadic eye movement tasks as an experimental tool to determine which CNS changes are associated with chronic petrol sniffing and which with a history of lead encephalopathy, and to what extent these changes are reversible. Saccade function was assessed in chronic petrol sniffers with a history of lead encephalopathy (encephalopathic sniffers), chronic petrol sniffers who had never suffered lead encephalopathy (chronic sniffers), individuals who had sniffed petrol in the past but had not done so for more than six months (ex-sniffers), and individuals who had never sniffed petrol (non-sniffers). Chronic sniffers showed increased latency of visually guided saccades and antisaccades and increased antisaccade errors which suggested cortical and basal ganglia dysfunction. These abnormalities returned to normal in ex-sniffers. Encephalopathic sniffers showed the same abnormalities as chronic sniffers but with greater severity and additional saccadic signs including dysmetria, gaze evoked nystagmus, and saccade slowing which usually indicate cerebellar and brain stem dysfunction. Chronic petrol abuse is associated with cortical and basal ganglia abnormalities that are at least partially recoverable with abstinence. Additional long term cerebellar and brain stem abnormalities are associated with lead encephalopathy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Philippines 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 8 25%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 31%
Psychology 6 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 9 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2013.
All research outputs
#4,265,364
of 14,119,693 outputs
Outputs from Journal of neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,561
of 376,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,119,693 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.0. This one scored the same or higher as 0 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 376,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.