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Preterm Birth by Cesarean Section: The Gut-Brain Axis, a Key Regulator of Brain Development

Overview of attention for article published in Developmental Neuroscience, September 2023
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

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Title
Preterm Birth by Cesarean Section: The Gut-Brain Axis, a Key Regulator of Brain Development
Published in
Developmental Neuroscience, September 2023
DOI 10.1159/000534124
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cécile Morin, Cindy Bokobza, Bobbi Fleiss, Elisa L. Hill-Yardin, Juliette Van Steenwinckel, Pierre Gressens

Abstract

Understanding the long-term functional implications of gut microbial communities during the perinatal period is a bourgeoning area of research. Numerous studies have revealed the existence of a "gut-brain axis" and the impact of an alteration of gut microbiota composition in brain diseases. Recent research has highlighted how gut microbiota could affect brain development and behavior. Many factors in early life such as the mode of delivery or preterm birth could lead to disturbance in the assembly and maturation of gut microbiota. Notably, global rates of cesarean sections (C-sections) have increased in recent decades and remain important when considering premature delivery. Both preterm birth and C-sections are associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders; with neuroinflammation a major risk factor. In this review, we explore links between preterm birth by C-sections, gut microbiota alteration, and neuroinflammation. We also highlight C-sections as a risk factor for developmental disorders due to alterations in the microbiome.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Unknown 7 78%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Neuroscience 1 11%
Unknown 7 78%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2023.
All research outputs
#8,203,257
of 24,860,845 outputs
Outputs from Developmental Neuroscience
#150
of 531 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,611
of 332,812 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Developmental Neuroscience
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,860,845 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 531 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,812 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.