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Economic Development and Forest Cover: Evidence from Satellite Data

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
229 Mendeley
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Title
Economic Development and Forest Cover: Evidence from Satellite Data
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2017
DOI 10.1038/srep40678
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesús Crespo Cuaresma, Olha Danylo, Steffen Fritz, Ian McCallum, Michael Obersteiner, Linda See, Brian Walsh

Abstract

Ongoing deforestation is a pressing, global environmental issue with direct impacts on climate change, carbon emissions, and biodiversity. There is an intuitive link between economic development and overexploitation of natural resources including forests, but this relationship has proven difficult to establish empirically due to both inadequate data and convoluting geo-climactic factors. In this analysis, we use satellite data on forest cover along national borders in order to study the determinants of deforestation differences across countries. Controlling for trans-border geo-climactic differences, we find that income per capita is the most robust determinant of differences in cross-border forest cover. We show that the marginal effect of per capita income growth on forest cover is strongest at the earliest stages of economic development, and weakens in more advanced economies, presenting some of the strongest evidence to date for the existence of at least half of an environmental Kuznets curve for deforestation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 229 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Estonia 1 <1%
Unknown 223 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 35 15%
Researcher 32 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 14%
Student > Master 31 14%
Other 22 10%
Other 31 14%
Unknown 47 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 46 20%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 36 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 5%
Social Sciences 9 4%
Other 38 17%
Unknown 65 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 154. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2021.
All research outputs
#216,267
of 22,568,248 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#2,525
of 121,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,520
of 395,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#59
of 2,747 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,568,248 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 121,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,747 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.