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Methods of Soil Resampling to Monitor Changes in the Chemical Concentrations of Forest Soils

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Visualized Experiments, November 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Methods of Soil Resampling to Monitor Changes in the Chemical Concentrations of Forest Soils
Published in
Journal of Visualized Experiments, November 2016
DOI 10.3791/54815
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gregory B. Lawrence, Ivan J. Fernandez, Paul W. Hazlett, Scott W. Bailey, Donald S. Ross, Thomas R. Villars, Angelica Quintana, Rock Ouimet, Michael R. McHale, Chris E. Johnson, Russell D. Briggs, Robert A. Colter, Jason Siemion, Olivia L. Bartlett, Olga Vargas, Michael R. Antidormi, Mary M. Koppers

Abstract

Recent soils research has shown that important chemical soil characteristics can change in less than a decade, often the result of broad environmental changes. Repeated sampling to monitor these changes in forest soils is a relatively new practice that is not well documented in the literature and has only recently been broadly embraced by the scientific community. The objective of this protocol is therefore to synthesize the latest information on methods of soil resampling in a format that can be used to design and implement a soil monitoring program. Successful monitoring of forest soils requires that a study unit be defined within an area of forested land that can be characterized with replicate sampling locations. A resampling interval of 5 years is recommended, but if monitoring is done to evaluate a specific environmental driver, the rate of change expected in that driver should be taken into consideration. Here, we show that the sampling of the profile can be done by horizon where boundaries can be clearly identified and horizons are sufficiently thick to remove soil without contamination from horizons above or below. Otherwise, sampling can be done by depth interval. Archiving of sample for future reanalysis is a key step in avoiding analytical bias and providing the opportunity for additional analyses as new questions arise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Unspecified 2 14%
Other 2 14%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 7 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 21%
Unspecified 2 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#2,455,538
of 11,563,317 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Visualized Experiments
#713
of 5,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,303
of 322,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Visualized Experiments
#25
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,563,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,019 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,615 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.