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Treatment-seeking behaviour and barriers to service access for sexually transmitted diseases among men who have sex with men in China: a multicentre cross-sectional survey

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment-seeking behaviour and barriers to service access for sexually transmitted diseases among men who have sex with men in China: a multicentre cross-sectional survey
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-016-0219-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jun-Jie Xu, Yan-Qiu Yu, Qing-Hai Hu, Hong-Jing Yan, Zhe Wang, Lin Lu, Ming-Hua Zhuang, Xi Chen, Ji-Hua Fu, Wei-Ming Tang, Wen-Qing Geng, Yong-Jun Jiang, Hong Shang

Abstract

Delayed or inappropriate treatment for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) increases the risk of HIV acquisition and may cause other harmful outcomes. However, studies on STD treatment-seeking behaviour and correlated factors in men who have sex with men (MSM) are scarce. This information is crucial for the promotion of STD treatment-seeking behaviour and reduction of HIV transmission among Chinese MSM. During 2012-2013, a multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in 7 Chinese cities. Participants completed an interview-questionnaire and gave venous blood samples, which were then tested for antibodies to HIV, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2). MSM who tested positive for syphilis/HSV-2 or had obvious STD-related symptoms within the last 12 months were defined as suspected STD-infected MSM. Of the 4 496 eligible MSM who completed this survey, 24.4% (1 096/4 496) were categorized as suspected STD-infected MSM. 35.7% (391/1 096) of these MSM with suspected STD infections sought STD treatment in clinics within the last 12 months. Among MSM who did not attend STD clinics for treatment, the prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 was significantly higher; the HIV prevalence and incidence within this subpopulation reached as high as 14.5% and 12.2/100 person-years, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that having 7-12 years of education (vs. ≤6 years; aOR, 2.5; 95%CI, 1.0-6.1), ≥13 years of education (vs. ≤6 years: aOR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.2-7.0), monthly income >500 USD (vs. ≤500 USD: aOR, 1.5; 95%CI, 1.1-2.1), obvious STD-related symptoms within last 12 months (aOR, 5.3; 95%CI, 3.7-7.5), being HIV infected (aOR, 1.7; 95%CI, 1.1-2.6), currently syphilis infected (aOR, 0.6; 95%CI, 0.4-0.9) and HSV-2 infected (aOR, 0.6; 95%CI, 0.5-0.9) were independent correlates with seeking STD treatment in clinics among Chinese MSM. The high prevalence of STD infection coupled with a low proportion of individuals who exhibit appropriate treatment-seeking behaviour create a high risk of a growing HIV epidemic among Chinese MSM. Models that prioritize better screening for and education about STDs should be urgently implemented, especially among low-income MSM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Researcher 2 8%
Librarian 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 7 29%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 21%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2017.
All research outputs
#3,855,140
of 9,087,585 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#145
of 348 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,052
of 311,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#20
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,087,585 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 348 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,140 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.