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Post‐acute sequelae of SARS‐CoV‐2 (PASC) in nursing home residents: A retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, November 2023
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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14 news outlets
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2 blogs
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24 X users
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1 Redditor

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Title
Post‐acute sequelae of SARS‐CoV‐2 (PASC) in nursing home residents: A retrospective cohort study
Published in
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, November 2023
DOI 10.1111/jgs.18678
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie E. Clark, Liza Bautista, Karen Neeb, Ana Montoya, Kristen E. Gibson, Julia Mantey, Mohammed Kabeto, Lillian Min, Lona Mody

Abstract

Post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC) describes a syndrome of physical and cognitive decline that persists after acute symptoms of infection resolve. Few studies have explored PASC among nursing home (NH) residents. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at two NHs in Michigan. COVID-positive patients were identified from March 21, 2020 to October 26, 2021. The comparison group were patients who lived at the same NH but who were never infected during the study period. Minimum Data Set was used to examine trajectories of functional dependence (Activity of Daily Living [ADL] composite score) and cognitive function (Brief Interview for Mental Status [BIMS]). Linear mixed-effects models were constructed to estimate short-term change in function and cognition immediately following diagnosis and over time for an additional 12 months, compared to pre-COVID and non-COVID trajectories and adjusting for sex, age, and dementia status. We identified 171 residents (90 COVID-19 positive, 81 non-COVID) with 719 observations for our analyses. Cohort characteristics included: 108 (63%) ≥ 80 yrs.; 121 (71%) female; 160 (94%) non-Hispanic white; median of 3 comorbidities (IQR 2-4), with no significant differences in characteristics between groups. COVID-19 infection affected the trajectory of ADL recovery for the first 9 months following infection, characterized by an immediate post-infection decrease in functional status post-infection (-0.60 points, p = 0.002) followed by improvement toward the expected functional trajectory sans infection (0.04 points per month following infection, p = 0.271). NH residents experienced a significant functional decline that persisted for 9 months following acute infection. Further research is needed to determine whether increased rehabilitation services after COVID-19 may help mitigate this decline.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemical Engineering 1 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 50%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 117. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2024.
All research outputs
#356,896
of 25,391,471 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
#302
of 8,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,969
of 350,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
#2
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,391,471 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,112 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,446 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.