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Masquelier’s grape seed extract: from basic flavonoid research to a well-characterized food supplement with health benefits

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, January 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Masquelier’s grape seed extract: from basic flavonoid research to a well-characterized food supplement with health benefits
Published in
Nutrition Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0218-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antje R. Weseler, Aalt Bast

Abstract

Careful characterization and standardization of the composition of plant-derived food supplements is essential to establish a cause-effect relationship between the intake of that product and its health effect. In this review we follow a specific grape seed extract containing monomeric and oligomeric flavan-3-ols from its creation by Jack Masquelier in 1947 towards a botanical remedy and nutraceutical with proven health benefits. The preparation's research history parallels the advancing insights in the fields of molecular biology, medicine, plant and nutritional sciences during the last 70 years. Analysis of the extract's flavanol composition emerged from unspecific colorimetric assays to precise high performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting techniques. The early recognition of the preparation's auspicious effects on the permeability of vascular capillaries directed research to unravel the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Recent clinical data revealed a multitude of favorable alterations in the vasculature upon an 8 weeks supplementation which summed up in a health benefit of the extract in healthy humans. Changes in gene expression of inflammatory pathways in the volunteers' leukocytes were suggested to be involved in this benefit. The historically grown scientific evidence for the preparation's health effects paves the way to further elucidate its metabolic fate and molecular action in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Master 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2017.
All research outputs
#9,844,065
of 15,477,884 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#949
of 1,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,339
of 356,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,477,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,175 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.6. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 356,698 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them