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Non-invasive neural stem cells become invasive in vitro by combined FGF2 and BMP4 signaling

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cell Science, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
Title
Non-invasive neural stem cells become invasive in vitro by combined FGF2 and BMP4 signaling
Published in
Journal of Cell Science, June 2013
DOI 10.1242/jcs.125757
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. H. M. Sailer, A. Gerber, C. Tostado, G. Hutter, D. Cordier, L. Mariani, M.-F. Ritz

Abstract

Neural stem cells (NSCs) typically show efficient self-renewal and selective differentiation. Their invasion potential, however, is not well studied. In this study, Sox2-positive NSCs from the E14.5 rat cortex were found to be non-invasive and showed only limited migration in vitro. By contrast, FGF2-expanded NSCs showed a strong migratory and invasive phenotype in response to the combination of FGF2 and BMP4. Invasive NSCs expressed Podoplanin (PDPN) and p75NGFR (Ngfr) at the plasma membrane after exposure to FGF2 and BMP4. FGF2 and BMP4 together upregulated the expression of Msx1, Snail1, Snail2, Ngfr, which are all found in neural crest (NC) cells during or after epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), but not in forebrain stem cells. Invasive cells downregulated the expression of Olig2, Sox10, Egfr, Pdgfra, Gsh1/Gsx1 and Gsh2/Gsx2. Migrating and invasive NSCs had elevated expression of mRNA encoding Pax6, Tenascin C (TNC), PDPN, Hey1, SPARC, p75NGFR and Gli3. On the basis of the strongest upregulation in invasion-induced NSCs, we defined a group of five key invasion-related genes: Ngfr, Sparc, Snail1, Pdpn and Tnc. These genes were co-expressed and upregulated in seven samples of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) compared with normal human brain controls. Induction of invasion and migration led to low expression of differentiation markers and repressed proliferation in NSCs. Our results indicate that normal forebrain stem cells have the inherent ability to adopt a glioma-like invasiveness. The results provide a novel in vitro system to study stem cell invasion and a novel glioma invasion model: tumoral abuse of the developmental dorsoventral identity regulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Unspecified 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Unspecified 5 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,373,568
of 12,448,216 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cell Science
#1,251
of 4,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,069
of 148,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cell Science
#5
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,448,216 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,773 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.