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Bridges and Mechanisms: Integrating Systems Science Thinking into Implementation Research

Overview of attention for article published in Annual Review of Public Health, December 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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36 X users

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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Title
Bridges and Mechanisms: Integrating Systems Science Thinking into Implementation Research
Published in
Annual Review of Public Health, December 2023
DOI 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-060922-040205
Pubmed ID
Authors

Douglas A Luke, Byron J Powell, Alejandra Paniagua-Avila

Abstract

We present a detailed argument for how to integrate, or bridge, systems science thinking and methods with implementation science. We start by showing how fundamental systems science principles of structure, dynamics, information, and utility are relevant for implementation science. Then we examine the need for implementation science to develop and apply richer theories of complex systems. This can be accomplished by emphasizing a causal mechanisms approach. Identifying causal mechanisms focuses on the "cogs and gears" of public health, clinical, and organizational interventions. A mechanisms approach focuses on how a specific strategy will produce the implementation outcome. We show how connecting systems science to implementation science opens new opportunities for examining and addressing social determinants of health and conducting equitable and ethical implementation research. Finally, we present case studies illustrating successful applications of systems science within implementation science in community health policy, tobacco control, health care access, and breast cancer screening. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Public Health, Volume 45 is April 2024. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 20%
Researcher 1 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 20%
Student > Master 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%
Computer Science 1 20%
Psychology 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2024.
All research outputs
#1,745,986
of 25,830,657 outputs
Outputs from Annual Review of Public Health
#263
of 854 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,264
of 363,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annual Review of Public Health
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,830,657 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 854 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.