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Value for money? An examination of the relationship between need and cost in intellectual disability services

Overview of attention for article published in Health & Social Care in the Community, January 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Value for money? An examination of the relationship between need and cost in intellectual disability services
Published in
Health & Social Care in the Community, January 2017
DOI 10.1111/hsc.12425
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jodi Cronin, Jane Bourke

Abstract

The recent economic crisis along with changing demographic trends has stimulated an increased interest in the value obtained from social care expenditure so as to ensure the sustainability of systems in the future. In Ireland, the Department of Health, further to a recent review of its disability services, commited to a new approach that will reshape and redesign its service provision. It specifically outlined a reorganisation of financing services, from a model of prospective block grant funding to a system of individualised budgeting based on an assessment of need. This paper examines the relationship between need, service utilisation and cost for high-cost users of adult intellectual disability residential services in an Irish county under the current model of block grant financing. The analysis reported is based on primary data collected from 68 high-cost users of adult intellectual disability residential services in an Irish county in 2013. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the relationship between need and cost, and also to examine the variations in the cost of support between the service provider organisations. Our analysis determined an association between need and cost, with poorer levels of psychological well-being related to higher costs. However, the study found no evident relationship between staff/client ratios, the numbers of staff engaged at the residential units and need. An examination of cost variations between the service provider organisations revealed that agency status; service unit size; client and staff characteristics all contributed to variations in the cost of care. This study supports the development of a national resource allocation framework as being fundamental to the equitable and transparent distribution of scarce resources, as recommended by the Department of Health in Ireland.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 19%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 13%
Unspecified 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 12 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Unspecified 5 10%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2017.
All research outputs
#15,437,553
of 22,947,506 outputs
Outputs from Health & Social Care in the Community
#1,468
of 1,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#255,983
of 419,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health & Social Care in the Community
#23
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,947,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,986 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.