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Efficacy of text-message reminders on paediatric malaria treatment adherence and their post-treatment return to health facilities in Kenya: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Efficacy of text-message reminders on paediatric malaria treatment adherence and their post-treatment return to health facilities in Kenya: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1702-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ambrose O. Talisuna, Amos Oburu, Sophie Githinji, Josephine Malinga, Beatrice Amboko, Philip Bejon, Caroline Jones, Robert W. Snow, Dejan Zurovac

Abstract

Short Message Service (SMS) reminders have been suggested as a potential intervention for improving adherence to medications and health facility attendance. An open-label, randomized, controlled trial to test the efficacy of automated SMS reminders in improving adherence to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and post-treatment attendance in comparison with standard care was conducted at four health facilities in western Kenya. Children below five years of age with uncomplicated malaria were randomized to intervention (SMS reminders) or control groups. Within each study group they were further randomized to three categories, which determined the timing of home visits to measure adherence to complete AL course and to individual AL doses. A sub-set of caregivers was advised to return to the facility on day 3 and all were advised to return after 28 days. The primary outcomes were adherence to medication and return on day 3. The primary analysis was by intention-to-treat. Between 9 June, 2014 and 26 February, 2016, 1677 children were enrolled. Of 562 children visited at home on day 3, all AL doses were completed for 97.6% (282/289) of children in the control and 97.8% (267/273) in the intervention group (OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 0.37-3.33; p = 0.860). When correct timing in taking each dose was considered a criteria for adherence, 72.3% (209/289) were adherent in the control and 69.2% (189/273) in the intervention group (OR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.56-1.19; p = 0.302). Sending SMS reminders significantly increased odds of children returning to the facility on day 3 (81.4 vs 74.0%; OR = 1.55; 95% CI = 1.15-2.08; p = 0.004) and on day 28 (63.4 vs 52.5%; OR = 1.58; 95% CI = 1.30-1.92; p < 0.001). In this efficacy trial, SMS reminders increased post-treatment return to the health facility, but had no effect on AL adherence which was high in both control and intervention groups. Further effectiveness studies under the real world conditions are needed to determine the optimum role of SMS reminders. Trial registration ISRCTN39512726.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Vietnam 1 2%
Bangladesh 1 2%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 38%
Unspecified 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 23%
Unspecified 11 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Social Sciences 6 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 6%
Other 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,796,557
of 8,968,121 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,595
of 3,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,459
of 308,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#55
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,968,121 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,126 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,692 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.