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Gender stereotypes about intellectual ability emerge early and influence children’s interests

Overview of attention for article published in Science, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#32 of 72,276)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
292 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1100 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Gender stereotypes about intellectual ability emerge early and influence children’s interests
Published in
Science, January 2017
DOI 10.1126/science.aah6524
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lin Bian, Sarah-Jane Leslie, Andrei Cimpian

Abstract

Common stereotypes associate high-level intellectual ability (brilliance, genius, etc.) with men more than women. These stereotypes discourage women's pursuit of many prestigious careers; that is, women are underrepresented in fields whose members cherish brilliance (such as physics and philosophy). Here we show that these stereotypes are endorsed by, and influence the interests of, children as young as 6. Specifically, 6-year-old girls are less likely than boys to believe that members of their gender are "really, really smart." Also at age 6, girls begin to avoid activities said to be for children who are "really, really smart." These findings suggest that gendered notions of brilliance are acquired early and have an immediate effect on children's interests.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,194 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 1079 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 210 19%
Student > Bachelor 167 15%
Student > Master 147 13%
Researcher 134 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 85 8%
Other 204 19%
Unknown 153 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 300 27%
Social Sciences 157 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 91 8%
Engineering 40 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 39 4%
Other 278 25%
Unknown 195 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4982. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2021.
All research outputs
#428
of 18,365,335 outputs
Outputs from Science
#32
of 72,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7
of 370,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#2
of 968 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,365,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72,276 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 56.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 370,084 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 968 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.