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Structural overshoot of tree growth with climate variability and the global spectrum of drought-induced forest dieback

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Structural overshoot of tree growth with climate variability and the global spectrum of drought-induced forest dieback
Published in
Global Change Biology, March 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13636
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alistair S. Jump, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Sarah Greenwood, Craig D. Allen, Thomas Kitzberger, Rod Fensham, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret

Abstract

Ongoing climate change poses significant threats to plant function and distribution. Increased temperatures and altered precipitation regimes amplify drought frequency and intensity, elevating plant stress and mortality. Large-scale forest mortality events will have far-reaching impacts on carbon and hydrological cycling, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. However, biogeographical theory and global vegetation models poorly represent recent forest die-off patterns. Furthermore, since trees are sessile and long-lived, their responses to climate extremes are substantially dependent on historical factors. We show that periods of favourable climatic and management conditions that facilitate abundant tree growth can lead to structural overshoot of above-ground tree biomass due to a subsequent temporal mismatch between water demand and availability. When environmental favourability declines, increases in water and temperature stress that are protracted, rapid, or both, drive a gradient of tree structural responses that can modify forest self-thinning relationships. Responses ranging from premature leaf senescence and partial canopy dieback to whole-tree mortality reduce canopy leaf area during the stress period, and for a lagged recovery window thereafter. Such temporal mismatches of water requirements from availability can occur at local to regional scales throughout a species geographical range. Since climate change projections predict large future fluctuations in both wet and dry conditions, we expect forests to become increasingly structurally mismatched to water availability and thus over-built during more stressful episodes. By accounting for the historical context of biomass development, our approach can explain previously problematic aspects of large-scale forest mortality, such as why it can occur throughout the range of a species and yet still be locally highly variable, and why some events seem readily attributable to an ongoing drought while others do not. This refined understanding can facilitate better projections of structural overshoot responses, enabling improved prediction of changes to forest distribution and function from regional to global scales. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 96 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 35%
Researcher 18 18%
Student > Master 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Professor 7 7%
Other 21 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 43 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 27%
Unspecified 14 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 11%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Other 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2017.
All research outputs
#828,143
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#1,034
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,695
of 334,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#49
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 334,655 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.