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I want to media multitask and I want to do it now: Individual differences in media multitasking predict delay of gratification and system-1 thinking

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, January 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

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6 tweeters

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54 Mendeley
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Title
I want to media multitask and I want to do it now: Individual differences in media multitasking predict delay of gratification and system-1 thinking
Published in
Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41235-016-0048-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dan Schutten, Kirk A. Stokes, Karen M. Arnell

Abstract

Media multitasking, the concurrent use of multiple media forms, has been shown to be related to greater self-reported impulsivity and less self-control. These measures are both hallmarks of the need for immediate gratification which has been associated with fast, intuitive 'system-1' decision making, as opposed to more deliberate and effortful 'system-2' decision making. In Study 1, we used the Cognitive Reflection Task (CRT) to examine whether individuals who engage heavily in media multitasking differ from those who are light media multitaskers in their degree of system-1 versus system-2 thinking. In Study 2 we examined whether heavy and light media multitaskers differ in delay of gratification, using the delay discounting measure which estimates the preference for smaller immediate rewards, relative to larger delayed rewards in a hypothetical monetary choice task. We found that heavy media multitaskers were more likely than light media multitaskers to endorse intuitive, but wrong, decisions on the CRT indicating a greater reliance on 'system-1' thinking. Heavy media multitaskers were also willing to settle for less money immediately relative to light media multitaskers who were more willing to wait for the larger delayed reward. These results suggest that heavy media multitaskers have a reactive decision-making style that promotes current desires (money, ease of processing) at the expense of accuracy and future rewards. These findings highlight the potential for heavy media multitaskers to be at risk for problematic behaviors associated with delay discounting - behaviors such as substance abuse, overeating, problematic gambling, and poor financial management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 31%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 19%
Computer Science 5 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 7%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 6 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2017.
All research outputs
#3,069,734
of 11,735,753 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#50
of 85 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,489
of 326,895 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications
#7
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,735,753 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.5. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,895 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.