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Climate change and health in Israel: adaptation policies for extreme weather events

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#19 of 442)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Climate change and health in Israel: adaptation policies for extreme weather events
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, June 2013
DOI 10.1186/2045-4015-2-23
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manfred S Green, Noemie Groag Pri-or, Guedi Capeluto, Yoram Epstein, Shlomit Paz

Abstract

Climatic changes have increased the world-wide frequency of extreme weather events such as heat waves, cold spells, floods, storms and droughts. These extreme events potentially affect the health status of millions of people, increasing disease and death. Since mitigation of climate change is a long and complex process, emphasis has recently been placed on the measures required for adaptation. Although the principles underlying these measures are universal, preparedness plans and policies need to be tailored to local conditions. In this paper, we conducted a review of the literature on the possible health consequences of extreme weather events in Israel, where the conditions are characteristic of the Mediterranean region. Strong evidence indicates that the frequency and duration of several types of extreme weather events are increasing in the Mediterranean Basin, including Israel. We examined the public health policy implications for adaptation to climate change in the region, and proposed public health adaptation policy options. Preparedness for the public health impact of increased extreme weather events is still relatively limited and clear public health policies are urgently needed. These include improved early warning and monitoring systems, preparedness of the health system, educational programs and the living environment. Regional collaboration should be a priority.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Pakistan 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Social Sciences 11 14%
Environmental Science 9 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 20 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2019.
All research outputs
#1,635,380
of 16,029,194 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#19
of 442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,439
of 158,602 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,029,194 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 442 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,602 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them