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Learning global health: a pilot study of an online collaborative intercultural peer group activity involving medical students in Australia and Indonesia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, January 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Learning global health: a pilot study of an online collaborative intercultural peer group activity involving medical students in Australia and Indonesia
Published in
BMC Medical Education, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0851-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark Ambrose, Linda Murray, Nicholas E. Handoyo, Deif Tunggal, Nick Cooling

Abstract

There is limited research to inform effective pedagogies for teaching global health to undergraduate medical students. Theoretically, using a combination of teaching pedagogies typically used in 'international classrooms' may prove to be an effective way of learning global health. This pilot study aimed to explore the experiences of medical students in Australia and Indonesia who participated in a reciprocal intercultural participatory peer e-learning activity (RIPPLE) in global health. Seventy-one third year medical students (49 from Australia and 22 from Indonesia) from the University of Tasmania (Australia) and the University of Nusa Cendana (Indonesia) participated in the RIPPLE activity. Participants were randomly distributed into 11 intercultural 'virtual' groups. The groups collaborated online over two weeks to study a global health topic of their choice, and each group produced a structured research abstract. Pre- and post-RIPPLE questionnaires were used to capture students' experiences of the activity. Descriptive quantitative data were analysed with Microsoft Excel and qualitative data were thematically analysed. Students' motivation to volunteer for this activity included: curiosity about the innovative approach to learning; wanting to expand knowledge of global health; hoping to build personal and professional relationships; and a desire to be part of an intercultural experience. Afer completing the RIPPLE program, participants reported on global health knowledge acquisition, the development of peer relationships, and insight into another culture. Barriers to achieving the learning outcomes associated with RIPPLE included problems with establishing consistent online communication, and effectively managing time to simultaneously complete RIPPLE and other curricula activities. Medical students from both countries found benefits in working together in small virtual groups to complement existing teaching in global health. However, our pilot study demonstrated that while intercultural collaborative peer learning activities like RIPPLE are feasible, they require robust logistical support and an awareness of the need to manage curriculum alignment in ways that facilitate more effective student engagement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 26%
Unspecified 14 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 16 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 19%
Psychology 12 18%
Social Sciences 12 18%
Computer Science 5 7%
Other 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,549,712
of 9,006,411 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#890
of 1,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,097
of 308,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#33
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,006,411 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 308,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.