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Occurrence and risk screening of alcohol ethoxylate surfactants in three U.S. river sediments associated with wastewater treatment plants

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2013
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1 tweeter

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Occurrence and risk screening of alcohol ethoxylate surfactants in three U.S. river sediments associated with wastewater treatment plants
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.05.047
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hans Sanderson, Remi van Compernolle, Scott D. Dyer, Bradford B. Price, Allen M. Nielsen, Martin Selby, Darci Ferrer, Kathleen Stanton

Abstract

Alcohol ethoxylates (AE) are high production volume (HPV) chemicals globally used in detergent and personal care products and are truly a work-horse for the household and personal care industries. Commercial AE generally consist of a mixture of several homologues of varying carbon chain length and degree of ethoxylation. Homologues that are not ethoxylated are also known as aliphatic alcohols or simply fatty alcohols (FA). This group of homologues represents a special interest in the context of environmental risk, as these are also abundant and ubiquitous naturally occurring compounds (e.g. animal fats and in human feces). Hence, in a risk assessment one needs to distinguish between the natural (background) concentrations and the added contribution from anthropogenic activities. We conducted a weight-of-evidence risk assessment in three streams, documenting the exposure and predicted risk, and compared these to the habitat and in situ biota. We found that the parameters (e.g., habitat quality and total perturbations hereunder total suspended solids (TSS) and other abiotic and biotic stressors) contributed to the abundance of biota rather than the predicted risk from AE and FA. Moreover, the documented natural de novo synthesis and rapid degradation of FA highlight the need to carefully consider the procedures for environmental risk assessment of naturally occurring compounds such as FA, e.g. in line with the added risk concept known from metal risk assessment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
India 1 3%
Singapore 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 34 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 39%
Chemistry 6 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2013.
All research outputs
#9,902,187
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#9,187
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,290
of 158,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#36
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,032 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.