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Exploring Differences in the Aspirin–Colorectal Cancer Association by Sex and Race/Ethnicity: The Multiethnic Cohort Study

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Exploring Differences in the Aspirin–Colorectal Cancer Association by Sex and Race/Ethnicity: The Multiethnic Cohort Study
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, February 2017
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-16-0560
Pubmed ID
Authors

Song-Yi Park, Lynne R. Wilkens, Laurence N. Kolonel, Kristine R. Monroe, Christopher A. Haiman, Loïc Le Marchand

Abstract

Evidence has accumulated that long-term use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) protects against colorectal cancer (CRC). We tested whether the inverse associations between NSAIDs and CRC is similarly observed across sexes and five racial/ethnic groups (Japanese, Latino, African American, Native Hawaiian, and white) in the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) Study. During a mean follow-up of 16.1 years, we identified 4,882 invasive incident CRC cases among 183,199 eligible participants. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Use of aspirin and other NSAIDs was associated with a lower incidence of CRC in men (HR=0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.86 for current vs. never users of aspirin) but not in women (Pinteraction=0.005). Among male current users, a reduced risk was observed with {greater than or equal to}6 years of aspirin or total NSAID use. The inverse association with current NSAID use in men was observed in all racial/ethnic groups, except for Native Hawaiians, and was stronger in whites. Our findings suggest that the benefit of NSAIDs for CRC may be strongest for white men and generalizes to African American, Japanese and Latino but not to Native Hawaiian men. The lack of inverse association observed in women and Native Hawaiian men in the MEC should be interpreted with caution. Since only very few ethnic/racial groups are likely to be represented in trials of NSAIDs and CRC, it is important to conduct prospective observational studies in various populations to test the generalizability of their results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 25%
Student > Bachelor 3 15%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Professor 2 10%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2022.
All research outputs
#2,413,536
of 22,780,165 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#745
of 4,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,772
of 419,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#17
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,780,165 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,577 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,674 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.