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Get Healthy after Breast Cancer - examining the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to a general population telephone-delivered program targeting physical…

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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Title
Get Healthy after Breast Cancer - examining the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to a general population telephone-delivered program targeting physical activity, healthy diet and weight loss
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3599-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Lawler, G. Maher, M. Brennan, A. Goode, M. M. Reeves, E. Eakin

Abstract

This pilot study assessed the feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of referring breast cancer survivors to the 'Get Healthy Service' (GHS), a state health-funded 6-month telephone-delivered lifestyle program. Pre-post study with eligible and consenting women following treatment for stages I-III breast cancer referred by nurses in a cancer treatment centre to the GHS. Feasibility was assessed via GHS uptake and completion; acceptability was assessed via patient satisfaction and nurse feedback. Changes in weight, physical activity, diet, quality of life (QoL) and fatigue from baseline to 6 months were examined. Fifty-three women (mean ± SD body mass index, 31.0 ± 5.5 kg/m(2); age, 57.3 ± 10.0 years; 14.0 ± 7.1 months post-diagnosis; 43.4% born outside Australia, 49% high school or less education, 32.1% English as a second language) took up the GHS, with 62% completing the program. Almost all (92%) completers had high satisfaction ratings and breast nurses provided positive feedback. Findings from GHS completers (n = 33) show a statistically significant effect from baseline to 6 months for weight loss (mean ± SE; -2.4 ± 0.7 kg; p = 0.002) and total physical activity minutes per week (55 ± 18 min/week; p = 0.006). No significant changes in fruit or vegetable servings per day or takeaways and fast food frequency per week were observed. A significant improvement in mental QoL was observed (3.5 ± 1.6; p = 0.041), but not for physical QoL or fatigue. GHS referral appeared feasible, acceptable and effective for a diverse group of women following completion of treatment for breast cancer, yet more remains to be done to fully integrate GHS screening and referral into usual care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 25%
Student > Bachelor 10 21%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Professor 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 23%
Unspecified 7 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Psychology 5 10%
Other 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2017.
All research outputs
#5,742,298
of 11,318,094 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,055
of 2,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,959
of 319,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#37
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,318,094 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.