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Assessing non-metro recovery across two continents: issues and limitations

Overview of attention for article published in Disasters, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing non-metro recovery across two continents: issues and limitations
Published in
Disasters, September 2016
DOI 10.1111/disa.12212
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward J. Blakely, Peter M.J. Fisher

Abstract

Rural and remote areas of countries such as Australia and the United States are less well-resourced and often poorer than their city counterparts. When a disaster strikes, therefore, their long-term recovery can be impeded by being situated 'over the horizon'. Nonetheless, they are likely to enjoy higher social capital, with 'locals' banding together to help restore economic and social life in the wake of a calamitous incident. At the same time, a repeat of extreme events, springing in part from alteration to the landscape through intense human occupation, threatens to derail sustainable recovery processes everywhere, suggesting that renewed emphasis needs to be placed on preparedness. Improved metrics are also required, spanning both pre- and post-disaster phases, to determine effectiveness. Moreover, a focus on the 'hardening' of towns offers a better return in limiting damage and potentially hastens the speed of recovery should these places later fall victim to extreme events.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 13%
Unknown 7 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Lecturer 1 13%
Professor 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 3 38%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 13%
Environmental Science 1 13%
Materials Science 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2017.
All research outputs
#1,770,910
of 12,514,593 outputs
Outputs from Disasters
#87
of 544 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,505
of 337,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Disasters
#3
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,514,593 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 544 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.