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Maternal intake of methyl-group donors affects DNA methylation of metabolic genes in infants

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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53 Dimensions

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119 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal intake of methyl-group donors affects DNA methylation of metabolic genes in infants
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0321-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara Pauwels, Manosij Ghosh, Radu Corneliu Duca, Bram Bekaert, Kathleen Freson, Inge Huybrechts, Sabine A. S. Langie, Gudrun Koppen, Roland Devlieger, Lode Godderis

Abstract

Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and infant nutrition in the early postnatal period (lactation) are critically involved in the development and health of the newborn infant. The Maternal Nutrition and Offspring's Epigenome (MANOE) study was set up to assess the effect of maternal methyl-group donor intake (choline, betaine, folate, methionine) on infant DNA methylation. Maternal intake of dietary methyl-group donors was assessed using a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Before and during pregnancy, we evaluated maternal methyl-group donor intake through diet and supplementation (folic acid) in relation to gene-specific (IGF2 DMR, DNMT1, LEP, RXRA) buccal epithelial cell DNA methylation in 6 months old infants (n = 114) via pyrosequencing. In the early postnatal period, we determined the effect of maternal choline intake during lactation (in mothers who breast-fed for at least 3 months) on gene-specific buccal DNA methylation (n = 65). Maternal dietary and supplemental intake of methyl-group donors (folate, betaine, folic acid), only in the periconception period, was associated with buccal cell DNA methylation in genes related to growth (IGF2 DMR), metabolism (RXRA), and appetite control (LEP). A negative association was found between maternal folate and folic acid intake before pregnancy and infant LEP (slope = -1.233, 95% CI -2.342; -0.125, p = 0.0298) and IGF2 DMR methylation (slope = -0.706, 95% CI -1.242; -0.107, p = 0.0101), respectively. Positive associations were observed for maternal betaine (slope = 0.875, 95% CI 0.118; 1.633, p = 0.0241) and folate (slope = 0.685, 95% CI 0.245; 1.125, p = 0.0027) intake before pregnancy and RXRA methylation. Buccal DNMT1 methylation in the infant was negatively associated with maternal methyl-group donor intake in the first and second trimester of pregnancy and negatively in the third trimester. We found no clear association between maternal choline intake during lactation and buccal infant DNA methylation. This study suggests that maternal dietary and supplemental intake of methyl-group donors, especially in the periconception period, can influence infant's buccal DNA methylation in genes related to metabolism, growth, appetite regulation, and maintenance of DNA methylation reactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 18%
Researcher 17 14%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Other 6 5%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 18 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 26 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2018.
All research outputs
#4,172,487
of 13,877,211 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#315
of 700 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,416
of 348,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#4
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,877,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 700 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.