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Prediction of clinical peanut allergy status among children in Hamilton, Ontario using chart review data collected during 2012–2015

Overview of attention for article published in Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, February 2017
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1 Facebook page

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Title
Prediction of clinical peanut allergy status among children in Hamilton, Ontario using chart review data collected during 2012–2015
Published in
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13223-017-0179-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth Simms, Gary Foster, Katherine Arias, Mark Larché, Tosha Freitag, Tina Walker, Susanna Goncharova, Andrea Marrin, Andreas Freitag, Manel Jordana, Susan Waserman

Abstract

Peanut sensitization does not necessarily indicate clinical peanut allergy, and uncertainty as to whether or not there is true peanut allergy can lead to increased anxiety and decreased quality of life for patients and their families. The gold standard for diagnosing clinical peanut allergy is the oral food challenge, but this method is time-consuming and can cause severe allergic reactions. It would therefore be beneficial to develop a tool for predicting clinical peanut allergy in peanut-sensitized individuals whose peanut allergy status is unknown so as to better determine who requires an oral food challenge for diagnosis. Two separate studies were conducted. In Study 1, we recruited 100 participants from the allergy clinic at McMaster University and community allergy outpatient clinics in the greater Hamilton area. We examined 18 different variables from participants and used univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine how well these variables, singly and in combination, were able to predict clinical peanut allergy status. In Study 2, we conducted a retrospective chart review of a second cohort of 194 participants to investigate the reproducibility of our findings. This was a matched case-control study where 97 peanut-allergic participants were gender- and age-matched to 97 non-allergic control participants. Peanut skin prick test wheal size was the best predictor of clinical peanut allergy in both study cohorts. For every 1 mm increase in wheal size, the odds ratio of an individual having clinical peanut allergy was 2.36 in our first cohort and 4.85 in our second cohort. No other variable approached the predictive power of wheal size. Peanut skin prick test wheal size is a robust predictor of clinical peanut reactivity. The findings of this study may be useful in guiding clinician decision-making regarding peanut allergy diagnostics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 22%
Unspecified 3 17%
Researcher 3 17%
Other 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 39%
Unspecified 3 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2017.
All research outputs
#9,570,424
of 12,456,513 outputs
Outputs from Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
#372
of 456 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,382
of 332,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
#9
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,456,513 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 456 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,978 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.