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Evaluation of dogs with genetic hyperuricosuria and urate urolithiasis consuming a purine restricted diet: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, February 2017
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Title
Evaluation of dogs with genetic hyperuricosuria and urate urolithiasis consuming a purine restricted diet: a pilot study
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-0958-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jodi L. Westropp, Jennifer A. Larsen, Eric G. Johnson, Dannika Bannasch, Andrea J. Fascetti, Vincent Biourge, Yann Queau

Abstract

Urate urolithiasis is a common problem in breed homozygous for the mutation that results in hyperuricosuria. Low purine diets have been recommended to reduce purine intake in these dogs. A higher protein, purine restricted diet with water added was evaluated in dogs with genetic hyperuricosuria and a history of clinical urate urolithiasis over a one year time period. Dogs were evaluated at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after initiating the test diet. Bloodwork, urinalysis, abdominal ultrasound, body composition, and 24-h urinary purine metabolite analyses were performed. Transient, mild, self-limited lower urinary tract signs were noted in only one dog on a single day, despite variable but usually mild and occasionally moderate amounts of echogenic bladder stones (<2-3 mm in size) in almost every dog at each visit. No significant differences were noted in urine specific gravity, urine pH, lean body condition score or body composition. Urinary uric acid concentration was lower on the test diet (p = 0.008), but 24-h uric acid excretions were similar (p = 0.220) compared to baseline. Significant differences between least squares mean plasma amino acid concentrations measured at the 0 and 12-month visits were found only for valine (p = 0.0119) and leucine (p = 0.0017). This study suggests the use of a low purine, higher protein diet with added water may be beneficial as part of the management of dogs with genetic hyperuricosuria and history of clinical urate urolithiasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Other 6 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 24 55%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,842,789
of 9,048,693 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#1,142
of 1,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#257,422
of 310,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#42
of 55 outputs
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