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Acute Toxicity of the Lampricide 4‐Nitro‐3‐(trifluoromethyl)phenol to the Mussel (Obovaria subrotunda), Its Host (Percina maculata), and a Surrogate Mussel Species (Obovaria olivaria)

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, April 2024
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Title
Acute Toxicity of the Lampricide 4‐Nitro‐3‐(trifluoromethyl)phenol to the Mussel (Obovaria subrotunda), Its Host (Percina maculata), and a Surrogate Mussel Species (Obovaria olivaria)
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, April 2024
DOI 10.1002/etc.5868
Pubmed ID
Authors

Teresa J. Newton, Nicholas A. Schloesser, Cheryl A. Kaye, Chad K. Andresen, Michael A. Boogaard, Christina M. Carter, Ryan J. Ellingson, Courtney A. Kirkeeng, Justin R. Schueller

Abstract

The risk of lampricide applications (such as 4-nitro-3-[trifluoromethyl]phenol [TFM]) to nontarget fauna continues to be a concern within the Great Lakes Fishery Commission Sea Lamprey Control Program, especially among imperiled aquatic species-such as native freshwater mussels. The Grand River (Ohio, USA) is routinely treated for larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus), and this river contains populations of the federally threatened mussel Obovaria subrotunda. Given this spatial overlap, information on the sensitivity of O. subrotunda to TFM is needed. Our objectives were to assess the toxicity of TFM to (1) adult Obovaria olivaria (a surrogate for O. subrotunda), (2) glochidial larvae of O. olivaria and O. subrotunda, (3) juveniles of O. olivaria and O. subrotunda, and (4) adult Percina maculata (host for O. subrotunda glochidia). In acute toxicity tests, TFM was not toxic to glochidia and adult mussels at exposure concentrations that exceed typical treatment rates. Although significant dose-response relationships were observed in hosts and juveniles, survival was ≥95% (Percina maculata), ≥93% (O. olivaria), and ≥74% (O. subrotunda) at typical treatment rates. However, the steep slope of these dose-response relationships indicates that an approximately 20% difference in the treatment level can result in nearly an order of magnitude difference in survival. Collectively, these data indicate that routine sea lamprey control operations are unlikely to acutely affect these species or their host. However, given that many mussel species are long-lived (30-100 years), the risks posed by lampricide treatments in the Great Lakes would be further informed by research on the potential long-term effects of lampricides on imperiled species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2024;00:1-8. Published 2024. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

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Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2024.
All research outputs
#17,817,939
of 26,097,697 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#4,421
of 5,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,589
of 322,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#11
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,097,697 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,768 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.