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Seroprevalence and geographical distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 among volunteer blood donors in endemic areas of Iran

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, January 2017
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Title
Seroprevalence and geographical distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 among volunteer blood donors in endemic areas of Iran
Published in
Virology Journal, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12985-017-0693-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gharib Karimi, Maryam Zadsar, Ali Akbar Pourfathollah

Abstract

Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has a worldwide distribution and it is endemic in some regions of Iran. One of the most important routes of HTLV-1 transmission is via transfusion of contaminated blood components. The risk of transmission through asymptomatic blood donors, particularly in endemic areas should be considered and appropriately managed. The main objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and description the geographic distribution of HTLV-1 among voluntary blood donors in Iran. This retrospective study carried out using the data obtained from the main database of the seven blood transfusion centers of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization between 2009 and 2013. The presence of anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies were primarily assessed using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay. The Ab Kit assay, contain antigens for the screening of antibodies to HTLV type 1 and 2. So, it is expressed as HTLV 1/2 assay. Samples that were positive by the western blot confirmatory test were considered as definite positive HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 cases. The main socio-demographic variables were; age, gender, donation history and marital status. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to summarize the gathered data. The chi-Square Statistical test was used to test the association between groups, P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 1864489 blood donations were evaluated. There were 1840 confirmed HTLV-1 positive donations (0.098%). None were positive for anti-HTLV-2. The overall HTLV-1 prevalence was 98.7 per 100,000 donations during the 5 year period. Seroprevalence was higher among females, married and older blood donors. The overall seropositivity among first time, regular and lapsed donors was, 0.29% (290/100000), 0.001% (1/100000) and 0.02% (20/100000) respectively. A significant difference was observed between regular and the first time (p <0.0001) and also between lapsed and regular blood donors (p <0.0001). Most of the HTLV-1 seropositive blood donors (175 per 100,000) were from northeastern regions. We observed a gradual decline in overall HTLV-1 prevalence during the course of the study, the prevalence rate decreased from 0.13% (130/100000) in 2009 to 0.07% (70/100000) in 2013. The Seroprevalence of HTLV-1 among Iranian blood donors in the regions of our study still is considerable, but there is an obvious declining prevalence over the course of present study. Blood transfusion centers should continually evaluate the residual risk of infection in the country, especially in endemic areas.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 29%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Librarian 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 36%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 14%
Computer Science 1 7%
Mathematics 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2017.
All research outputs
#7,087,662
of 11,379,716 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,245
of 1,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,265
of 322,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#40
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,379,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,959 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,983 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.