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Analysing trends and forecasting malaria epidemics in Madagascar using a sentinel surveillance network: a web-based application

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
136 Mendeley
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Title
Analysing trends and forecasting malaria epidemics in Madagascar using a sentinel surveillance network: a web-based application
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1728-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Florian Girond, Laurence Randrianasolo, Lea Randriamampionona, Fanjasoa Rakotomanana, Milijaona Randrianarivelojosia, Maherisoa Ratsitorahina, Télesphore Yao Brou, Vincent Herbreteau, Morgan Mangeas, Sixte Zigiumugabe, Judith Hedje, Christophe Rogier, Patrice Piola

Abstract

The use of a malaria early warning system (MEWS) to trigger prompt public health interventions is a key step in adding value to the epidemiological data routinely collected by sentinel surveillance systems. This study describes a system using various epidemic thresholds and a forecasting component with the support of new technologies to improve the performance of a sentinel MEWS. Malaria-related data from 21 sentinel sites collected by Short Message Service are automatically analysed to detect malaria trends and malaria outbreak alerts with automated feedback reports. Roll Back Malaria partners can, through a user-friendly web-based tool, visualize potential outbreaks and generate a forecasting model. The system already demonstrated its ability to detect malaria outbreaks in Madagascar in 2014. This approach aims to maximize the usefulness of a sentinel surveillance system to predict and detect epidemics in limited-resource environments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Madagascar 1 <1%
Unknown 135 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 16%
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 24 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 19%
Computer Science 13 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 7%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Other 37 27%
Unknown 32 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2020.
All research outputs
#6,196,428
of 22,953,506 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,700
of 5,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,683
of 426,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#37
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,953,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,585 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 426,820 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.