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Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Immunology, March 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

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107 Mendeley
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Title
Multicenter Systems Analysis of Human Blood Reveals Immature Neutrophils in Males and During Pregnancy
Published in
The Journal of Immunology, March 2017
DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1601855
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jana Blazkova, Sarthak Gupta, Yudong Liu, Brice Gaudilliere, Edward A. Ganio, Christopher R. Bolen, Ron Saar-Dover, Gabriela K. Fragiadakis, Martin S. Angst, Sarfaraz Hasni, Nima Aghaeepour, David Stevenson, Nicole Baldwin, Esperanza Anguiano, Damien Chaussabel, Matthew C. Altman, Mariana J. Kaplan, Mark M. Davis, David Furman

Abstract

Despite clear differences in immune system responses and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases between males and females, there is little understanding of the processes involved. In this study, we identified a gene signature of immature-like neutrophils, characterized by the overexpression of genes encoding for several granule-containing proteins, which was found at higher levels (up to 3-fold) in young (20-30 y old) but not older (60 to >89 y old) males compared with females. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood neutrophils revealed more mature and responsive neutrophils in young females, which also exhibited an elevated capacity in neutrophil extracellular trap formation at baseline and upon microbial or sterile autoimmune stimuli. The expression levels of the immature-like neutrophil signature increased linearly with pregnancy, an immune state of increased susceptibility to certain infections. Using mass cytometry, we also find increased frequencies of immature forms of neutrophils in the blood of women during late pregnancy. Thus, our findings show novel sex differences in innate immunity and identify a common neutrophil signature in males and in pregnant women.

Twitter Demographics

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 18%
Student > Master 14 13%
Other 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 21 20%
Unknown 19 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 28 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 22 21%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,453,377
of 24,119,703 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Immunology
#9,764
of 30,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,094
of 311,666 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Immunology
#72
of 187 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,119,703 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,666 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 187 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.