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Climatic stress increases forest fire severity across the western United States

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
37 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
118 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
212 Mendeley
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Title
Climatic stress increases forest fire severity across the western United States
Published in
Ecology Letters, July 2013
DOI 10.1111/ele.12151
Pubmed ID
Authors

Phillip J. van Mantgem, Jonathan C. B. Nesmith, MaryBeth Keifer, Eric E. Knapp, Alan Flint, Lorriane Flint

Abstract

Pervasive warming can lead to chronic stress on forest trees, which may contribute to mortality resulting from fire-caused injuries. Longitudinal analyses of forest plots from across the western US show that high pre-fire climatic water deficit was related to increased post-fire tree mortality probabilities. This relationship between climate and fire was present after accounting for fire defences and injuries, and appeared to influence the effects of crown and stem injuries. Climate and fire interactions did not vary substantially across geographical regions, major genera and tree sizes. Our findings support recent physiological evidence showing that both drought and heating from fire can impair xylem conductivity. Warming trends have been linked to increasing probabilities of severe fire weather and fire spread; our results suggest that warming may also increase forest fire severity (the number of trees killed) independent of fire intensity (the amount of heat released during a fire).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 212 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 6%
Colombia 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 194 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 50 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 23%
Student > Master 37 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 18 8%
Student > Bachelor 13 6%
Other 31 15%
Unknown 15 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 87 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 29 14%
Engineering 5 2%
Computer Science 2 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 24 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2013.
All research outputs
#409,949
of 14,645,955 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#260
of 2,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,863
of 155,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#11
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,645,955 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,290 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 155,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.