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No increase in global temperature variability despite changing regional patterns

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
692 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
284 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
No increase in global temperature variability despite changing regional patterns
Published in
Nature, July 2013
DOI 10.1038/nature12310
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris Huntingford, Philip D. Jones, Valerie N. Livina, Timothy M. Lenton, Peter M. Cox, Huntingford C, Jones PD, Livina VN, Lenton TM, Cox PM

Abstract

Evidence from Greenland ice cores shows that year-to-year temperature variability was probably higher in some past cold periods, but there is considerable interest in determining whether global warming is increasing climate variability at present. This interest is motivated by an understanding that increased variability and resulting extreme weather conditions may be more difficult for society to adapt to than altered mean conditions. So far, however, in spite of suggestions of increased variability, there is considerable uncertainty as to whether it is occurring. Here we show that although fluctuations in annual temperature have indeed shown substantial geographical variation over the past few decades, the time-evolving standard deviation of globally averaged temperature anomalies has been stable. A feature of the changes has been a tendency for many regions of low variability to experience increases, which might contribute to the perception of increased climate volatility. The normalization of temperature anomalies creates the impression of larger relative overall increases, but our use of absolute values, which we argue is a more appropriate approach, reveals little change. Regionally, greater year-to-year changes recently occurred in much of North America and Europe. Many climate models predict that total variability will ultimately decrease under high greenhouse gas concentrations, possibly associated with reductions in sea-ice cover. Our findings contradict the view that a warming world will automatically be one of more overall climatic variation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 692 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 284 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 4%
Germany 5 2%
Canada 3 1%
Spain 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
France 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 9 3%
Unknown 244 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 97 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 77 27%
Student > Master 25 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 6%
Student > Bachelor 16 6%
Other 52 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 103 36%
Environmental Science 74 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 17%
Unspecified 28 10%
Chemistry 5 2%
Other 27 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 329. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2018.
All research outputs
#27,782
of 11,795,611 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#3,203
of 60,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#309
of 140,033 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#63
of 971 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,795,611 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 60,364 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 140,033 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 971 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.