↓ Skip to main content

Low-Pathogenic Influenza A Viruses in North American Diving Ducks Contribute to the Emergence of a Novel Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H7N8) Virus

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Virology, April 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Low-Pathogenic Influenza A Viruses in North American Diving Ducks Contribute to the Emergence of a Novel Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H7N8) Virus
Published in
Journal of Virology, April 2017
DOI 10.1128/jvi.02208-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yifei Xu, Andrew M. Ramey, Andrew S. Bowman, Thomas J. DeLiberto, Mary L. Killian, Scott Krauss, Jacqueline M. Nolting, Mia Kim Torchetti, Andrew B. Reeves, Richard J. Webby, David E. Stallknecht, Xiu-Feng Wan

Abstract

Introductions of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 into poultry from wild birds have the potential to mutate to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), but such viruses' origins are often unclear. In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused an outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the virus's origin, we sequenced genomes of 441 wild bird-origin influenza A viruses (IAVs) from North America and subjected them to evolutionary analyses. Results showed that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Preceding the outbreak, an isolate with six gene segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NA, and NS) sharing >99% sequence identity with those of H7N8 turkey isolates was recovered from a diving duck sampled in Kentucky, USA. H4N8 IAVs from other diving ducks possessed five H7N8-like gene segments (PB2, PB1, NA, MP, and NS, >98% sequence identity). Our findings suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute towards the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore, diving ducks may serve an important and understudied role in the maintenance, diversification, and transmission of IAVs in the wild bird reservoir.IMPORTANCE In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused a disease outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. Toward determining the origin of this virus, we sequenced and analyzed 441 wild bird-origin influenza strains isolated from wild birds inhabiting North America. We found that H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Our results suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute towards the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore diving ducks may serve an important and understudied role in the maintenance, diversification, and transmission of IAVs in the wild bird reservoir. Our study also highlights the importance of a coordinated, systematic, and collaborative surveillance for IAVs in both poultry and wild bird populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2017.
All research outputs
#657,904
of 14,123,042 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Virology
#248
of 14,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,015
of 258,152 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Virology
#11
of 157 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,123,042 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,074 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,152 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 157 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.