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Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
342 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Tree mortality across biomes is promoted by drought intensity, lower wood density and higher specific leaf area
Published in
Ecology Letters, February 2017
DOI 10.1111/ele.12748
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Greenwood, Paloma Ruiz-Benito, Jordi Martínez-Vilalta, Francisco Lloret, Thomas Kitzberger, Craig D. Allen, Rod Fensham, Daniel C. Laughlin, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bönisch, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Alistair S. Jump

Abstract

Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncertainties, we performed a global meta-analysis of 58 studies of drought-induced forest mortality. Mortality rates were modelled as a function of drought, temperature, biomes, phylogenetic and functional groups and functional traits. We identified a consistent global-scale response, where mortality increased with drought severity [log mortality (trees trees(-1)  year(-1) ) increased 0.46 (95% CI = 0.2-0.7) with one SPEI unit drought intensity]. We found no significant differences in the magnitude of the response depending on forest biomes or between angiosperms and gymnosperms or evergreen and deciduous tree species. Functional traits explained some of the variation in drought responses between species (i.e. increased from 30 to 37% when wood density and specific leaf area were included). Tree species with denser wood and lower specific leaf area showed lower mortality responses. Our results illustrate the value of functional traits for understanding patterns of drought-induced tree mortality and suggest that mortality could become increasingly widespread in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 342 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
China 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 336 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 22%
Researcher 70 20%
Student > Master 64 19%
Unspecified 32 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 8%
Other 74 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 146 43%
Environmental Science 123 36%
Unspecified 48 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 4%
Engineering 6 2%
Other 6 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 92. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2019.
All research outputs
#163,738
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#77
of 2,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,469
of 255,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#4
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,059 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.